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How to use Golfbookie



Don't Worry About Screwing Up!

If you make a mistake in entering bets, just go to the "Delete Bets" page, delete records associated with the bet, and re-enter the bet. Note: All bets other than individual match bets are divided and pro-rated amongst players, so one bet will generate more than one record. Be sure to delete all the records associated with each bet. If you need to add or delete a player, just go to "Add/Delete Player."

Mano-a-Mano Stats

To help determine bragging rights, check your winnings or losings against any other player in the group by going to the Mano-a-Mano page. Enter the player names and Golfbookie will calculate where the players stand relative to each other. Mano-a-Mano Stats includes the total of all individual bets and pro-rated team bets between any two players.


Individual Match Bets( Includes Nassaus)

Enter the winner name, loser name, date, course, bet amount, and scorer and then press "Record This Bet" button. Golfbookie will display all the individual match bets recorded that day, and the current Individual match bet moneylist.Nassau results are recorded here.

Team Match Bets

Using the multiple entry keys ( Ctrl key on PC, Command key on MAC ,) enter the winners names and losers names. Enter the date, course, bet amount, and scorer, and then press "Record This Bet" button. Golfbookie will pro-rate the bets among the players, display all the team match bets recorded that day, and the current team match bet moneylist.

Medal Bets

Enter the medal winner's name. Using the multiple entry keys ( Ctrl key on PC, Command key on MAC ,) enter all the losers' names. Enter the date, course, bet amount, and scorer and then press "Record This Bet" button. Golfbookie will display all the medal bets recorded that day, and the current medal bet moneylist.

Skins Bets

Enter the number of skins each player got, including 0 for any player that played but got no skins. Enter the date, course, the total amount of the pool, and scorer and then press "Record This Bet" button. Golfbookie will pro-rate the bets among the players, display all the skins bets recorded that day, and the current skins bet moneylist.

Points Bets( Includes Calcuttas)

Points bets (see examples below) are used for any bets where players accumulate points which are worth a certain amount. Enter the number of points each player got, including 0 for any player that played but got no points. Enter the date, course, bet amount (value of each point,) and scorer and then press "Record This Bet" button. Golfbookie will pro-rate the bets among the players, display all the points bets recorded that day, and the current points bet moneylist. Calcutta results are recorded here.

The Nines Bets (for 3 players)

"The Nines" bet is a great way to bet when you have three players. In the Nines, there are 9 points awarded on each hole. There are 4 point allocation possibilities:

1) If one player wins the hole by 2 strokes over the other 2 players, the first player gets 9 points and the other two players get 0 each.

2) If one player beats the other two players by 2 and 1 stroke respectively, the first player gets 5 points, the second player gets 3 points, and the third player gets 1 point.

3) If two players each beat the other player by one stroke, they each get 4 points and the third player gets 1 point.

4) If all three players tie the hole, they each get 3 points.

Thus there are alway 9 point per hole, or 162 points total for an 18-hole round.

Enter the number of points each player got. Enter the date, course, bet amount, and scorer and then press "Record This Bet" button. Golfbookie will pro-rate the bets among the players, display all the team match bets recorded that day, and the current team match bet moneylist. Remember, the points must always total 162!




Popular Bets using Golfbookie Individual or Team Match Bets (with thanks to about.com )

Nassau

Definition: The Nassau is one of the most popular golf tournament formats and golf bets. It's essentially three tournaments (or bets) in one: the front nine, back nine and 18-hole scores all count as separate tournaments or bets. In a Nassau tournament, the player (or team) winning the front nine wins a prize, the player (or team) winning the back nine gets a prize, and the player or team with the low 18-hole total wins a prize. As a bet, the most common form is the $2 Nassau. The front nine is worth $2, the back nine is worth $2 and the 18-hole total is worth $2. A player or team sweeping all three wins $6. Nassau results are recorded as individual match bets.

Calcutta

Definition: The term "Calcutta" describes a type of auction-pool wagering that can be applied to golf and many other sporting events. In golf, a Calcutta is most common at a tournament featuring 4-person teams, but a Calcutta can be held in conjunction with any type of golf tournament. In a Calcutta, golfers bid, auction style, on the golfer or team who they think will win the tournament (you can bid on yourself or your own team, too). All the money raised through the "auction" goes into the pot. At the end of the tournament, those who "won" the team that then won the tournament get a pre-determined payout from the auction pool. The precise rules of a Calcutta can vary from place to place; many tournament organizers employ software programs that apply odds and determine win-place-show amounts. Perhaps the simplest and most common Calcutta payout is 70 percent of the pool to the "owner" of the winning tournament team, 30 percent to the "owner" of the second-place tournament team. Among other variations is one that allows a golfer to buy back half of himself or his team from the winning bidder. For example, your team is "won" in the auction by Team X; if this rule is in effect, you can pay half of Team X's winning bid back to Team X in order to buy back half a stake in your own team. If your team then wins the tournament, your team and Team X split the Calcutta payout.



Popular Bets using Golfbookie Points Bets (with thanks to about.com )

Round Robin

Definition: Round Robin, sometimes called Hollywood or Sixes, is a points-based game for groups of four golfers. Round Robin pits the group members against each other, 2 on 2. The catch: Players rotate partners after every six holes so that each member of the foursome, over the course of the round, partners with every other member. Any scoring format for the 6-hole matches can be used, and each 6-hole segment is a separate wager. If at the end of the 18 holes you've been on two winning sides and one losing side, you come out ahead. Round Robin is best played by partners of similar skill levels, or by golfers using full handicaps. Also Known As: Sixes, Hollywood

Sandies

Definition: Depending on who's using the term, a "sandie" can mean making par on a hole in which you were in a bunker, or getting out of a bunker and into the hole in two strokes. On the PGA Tour, the statistical category called "sand save percentage" refers to getting up-and-down out of a greenside bunker. Score doesn't matter. It could be for a 9, but if a player is in a greenside bunker, then gets out and into the hole in two strokes (up-and-down), it's a sandie. For amateurs, "sandie" is more likely to refer to a points-based betting game whereby any player making par after having been in a bunker on the hole wins points or money. The bunker can be at any spot on the hole. But the particulars are really up to those playing the game. Alternate Spellings: Sandy

Bingo-Bango-Bongo

Definition: Bingo Bango Bongo is a points-based game that can be played by any number of players, from two up. In Bingo Bango Bongo, three types of achievements are rewarded with a point. The first player in a group to get his ball on the green gets a point (bingo). The player in the group whose ball is closest to the pin once all balls are on the green gets a point (bango). And the player in the group who is first to hole out gets a point (bongo). Add up the points at the end of the game, high points wins. Bingo Bango Bongo gives weaker players a chance to earn points because what matters is being first at something. For example, all members of the group tee off on a par-4. The player who hit the worst drive (farthest from the hole) plays first, and so has the first shot at winning the bingo point. So, too, with closest to the pin. The best players in the group are likely to be on the green in two (or three on a par-5), while the weakest players might be chipping. The closest-to-the-pin point is only earned once all balls are on the green, so the player who has hacked it up the fairway may be sitting just off the green and chipping - giving that player a great chance to pick up the bango point. Because of these factors (and because the first person putting will be the one farthest from the hole), strict etiquette must be enforced. The player who is away always plays first. For a variation, throw into the mix that any player winning all three points on a hole wins double points. Also Known As: Bingle Bangle Bungle

Arnies

Definition: An Arnie is a points-based side bet that is won by a golfer who makes par on a hole without ever being in the fairway. The amount of the bet is set before the round begins. Arnies are not something a golfer sets out to win, however - the round is played with the intent of playing as well as possible (no sandbagging, in other words). However, if along the way a golfer makes par on a hole without hitting the fairway, the Arnie is his reward. The bet is named for Arnold Palmer, who made quite a few pars in his career on holes where he failed to find the fairway. Also Known As: Seve

Hogans

Definition: A Hogan is the opposite, in a way, of an Arnie. This is a points-based side bet that is won by a golfer who hits the fairway(twice on par 5's,) then the green, and makes a birdie or a par. The amount of the bet is set before the round begins. You will be surprised at how few of these are made, even by great players. The bet is named for Ben Hogan, one of the game's most consistent players. Also Known As: Faldos

Aces and Dueces

Definition: Aces and Dueces, sometimes called Acey Ducey, is a points-based betting game best for groups of four golfers. On each hole, the low score (the "ace") wins an agreed upon amount from the other three players, and the high score (the "duece") loses an agreed upon amount to the other three players. The ace bet is usually worth twice the duece bet, but groups can agree on any amount. Ties for either the ace or the duece mean that no money is paid for that bet on that hole; carryovers are optional at the discretion of the group members (decide before the round starts). It works like this: Let's say the ace bet is for $2 and the duece bet is for $1. On the first hole, A makes 4, B makes 5, C makes 5, D makes 6. A is the "ace" and wins $2 each from B, C and D. D is the "duece" and owes $1 each to A, B and C. So A wins a total of $7 ($2 from each B, C and D, plus another $1 from D for being the "duece"), B and C have a net loss of $1 (they each pay $2 to A but get $1 from D), and D pays out $5 ($1 to each for being the duece, plus the $2 owed to A for his "ace" score). As you can see, this game can get expensive in a hurry if high amounts are used and one or two players dominate. Be sure to play with players of similar skills, or use full handicaps, and to set a reasonable bet amount if you're not a high-roller. Also Known As: Acey Ducey

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